Sunday, 10 December 2017

Snowy Loughborough

This morning I was due to go out on a walk around the town centre with a group of folk to look at our Art Deco heritage. However, it was too snowy for standing around observing and recording buildings so I went out for a bit of a walk around town on my own - well, not on my own, I had my camera with me! Here's some of what I saw:

I started my journey in Queen's Park, always a beautiful place, but even more atmospheric in the snow









Then I walked through the Market Place. The sockman was obviously enjoying the festive season, but shouldn't that be yellow cross-gaiters??


And I've seen some sights in my time, but never reindeer here before!

From here I walked over to the older part of town, where the Christmas trees looked very, ummm, Christmassy


And the real trees looked stunning!



The Swithland slate gravestones in the churchyard were either buried, or peeking out above the snow


Making my way back along Baxter Gate, the snow added a certain romance to the area, and the snowman was clearly enjoying his tea break!



Back through the Market Place again, where folk were singing and dancing in the, ummm, snow!

And the Christmas tree was listing towards Angel Yard!


Zhengs looked particularly bright and cheerful.


But by this time the pavements were beginning to get rather slushy


At the top of New Street, the trees were making their mark on the snow

And around the corner from the Blacksmith's Arms, the area around Brown's (did this used to be a dairy??) looked almost unrecognisable!


And nearby roads looked quite pretty.


And the only Art Deco building I photographed was along Baxter Gate



That's it for now folks!

You are welcome to quote passages from any of my posts, with appropriate credit. The correct citation for this looks as follow:

Dyer, Lynne (2017). Snowy Loughborough. Available fromhttps://lynneaboutloughborough.blogspot.com/2017/12/snowy-loughborough.html  [Accessed 10 December 2017]

Take down policy:
I post no pictures that are not my own, unless I have express permission so to do. All text is my own, and not copied from any other information sources, printed or electronic, unless identified and credited as such. If you find I have posted something in contravention of these statements, or if there are photographs of you which you would prefer not to be here, please contact me at the address listed on the About Me page, and I will remove these.
Thank you for reading this blog. 

Lynne  


  

Sunday, 3 December 2017

Ticklebelly, Lawrence and pubs

So, I still haven't tracked down that recent research I did, mostly because I've been a bit busy of late. Last night I went along to the Loughborough Archaeological and Historical Society meeting at which Ian Porter talked about his 200-mile walk to Tiverton, in commemoration of the same walk undertaken by about 150 Loughborough folk when they followed John Heathcoat to Tiverton to start a new life. You can read more about this - Luddites, Heathcoat and the Tiverton connection - over on the Old Rectory Museum and LAHS blog, where I've guest posted.

A couple of weeks ago I was in Newark, visiting the Civil War Centre. The permanent Civil War exhibition was great, but I also thoroughly enjoyed the medical exhibition, with its video of the way things used to be done. Also, there was a fantastic display over about 5 rooms, covering the life and work of T.E. Lawrence, relevant to Newark because I believe he was stationed there for a while after WW1. I must admit to not knowing much about him before visiting this exhibition, but as is often the case, his name came up in a number of places over the next week or so, and previously I probably wouldn't even have noticed.

One piece of research I've been re-visiting over the last couple of days is the history of the Blacksmith's Arms pub, which used to be called The Black Boy. You can guess that this pub name has now popped up in my world on several occasions since Thursday, including the news that the Black Boy in Leicester is again being proposed as flats. There's an interesting set of photos over on the Derelict Places website.


Yesterday I spent the day in Lincoln and came across a lovely little bakery I'd not seen before. I couldn't resist the look of the bread, so went in to buy a loaf. 20 minutes later I emerged, having had the courage to ask the owner about the origin of the name. It was an interesting story, something to do with a path that pigs used to walk along, and when the grass grew too long it used to tickle their tummies. Here's the story as they've told it on their website. Going out on a limb here, but was this how Ticklebelly Park got its name? Or is its origins more likely to come from similar pasts as talked about in these webpages:

http://sussexhistoryforum.co.uk/index.php?topic=2239.10;wap2

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/7812254.stm

http://www.bbc.co.uk/southerncounties/content/articles/2009/01/05/east_sussex_street_names_feature.shtml

http://www.kenthistoryforum.co.uk/index.php?PHPSESSID=h2tb9mb2luo9rmviuh9pohrgk4&topic=6658.0

Anyway, sorry for this week's brevity.

You are welcome to quote passages from any of my posts, with appropriate credit. The correct citation for this looks as follow:

Dyer, Lynne (2017). Tickleybelly, Lawrence and pubs. Available fromhttps://lynneaboutloughborough.blogspot.com/2017/12/ticklebelly-lawrence-and-pubs.html [Accessed 3 December 2017]

Take down policy:
I post no pictures that are not my own, unless I have express permission so to do. All text is my own, and not copied from any other information sources, printed or electronic, unless identified and credited as such. If you find I have posted something in contravention of these statements, or if there are photographs of you which you would prefer not to be here, please contact me at the address listed on the About Me page, and I will remove these.
Thank you for reading this blog. 

Lynne