Sunday, 21 January 2018

Anniversaries and names

I was off on a hunt for some information the other day, when I happened upon some dates, which I thought I'd share with you. Not sure how many we'll get through today, but here goes!

The year is: 878
King Alfred (known as Alfred the Great, a name given him by writers from the 16th century), was King of Wessex from 871-899, and during his reign he defended against invasion from the Vikings. So, during the year 878, after winning the Battle of Edington, King Alfred apparently made a deal with the Vikings, and Danelaw (a set of legal terms and definitions) was created in the North of England. Interestingly, King Alfred ceded Loughborough and the area around it to the Danes as part of this Danelaw. Is this why people from the South like to think that we are in the North of the country?! How wrong they are: we're in the Midlands!! In reality, however, the part of the country ruled by Danelaw stretched from Windsor in the South, almost as far as Durham in the North, from half-way between Lichfield and Leicester in the West to the Norfolk coast in the East.

The Vikings brought their language with them, and many of these have been absorbed into English. There's a great list over at Babbel, and the BL website also indicates those place names ending in -by, a word of Viking origin, initially meaning a farmstead, some of which grew into larger villages and towns, but kept the name. There are many villages and towns ending in -by in our area, like Sileby, Ashby, Kirby Muxloe, Asfordby etc..

Then, there's also all those words ending in, or containing -thorpe, a word meaning a secondary settlement, or small hamlet. Places around Loughborough that come to mind are Thorpe Acre, Shelthorpe, Woodthorpe, but should I mention Barkby Thorpe here or under -by!

-toft, again, meaning a small farmstead, however, is not much used in Leicestershire: I can only think of Scraptoft and Knaptoft.

-wick may be Viking, meaning creek, or bay, but might also be an Anglo-Saxon word for port. The only one I can think of locally is Whitwick.

-kirk is a Viking word for church, and indeed, is most often found these days as church - so, Church Langton, Church Greasley. 

-gata, meaning way, or street, is found locally in the form -gate, usually as a suffix in street names, like Baxter Gate, Pinfold Gate etc.. So, Church Gate combines Kirk with Gata and was once known as Kirk Gate.

-borough, finally, King Alfred fortified some of the towns to become defence centres in case the Vikings attacked again. -borough means a fortified place, and is sometimes found as -burgh, -brough, -bury. However, the Anglo-Saxons also used the word -borough in relation to Iron Age and Roman forts they found in Britain when they invaded. There are many -boroughs in our area, not least our own town. Latest thinking is that Loughborough is the fortified place belonging to Lehedes.     

The year is: 918
In 918, Leicestershire, which included Loughborough, was recaptured by the British from the Danes.

I don't know about you, but I think that's enough dates for one day!

Thanks for reading!


Parish boundary marker at Woodthorpe



Church Gate during inner relief roadworks, May 2013



Informative street sign in Heanor, Derbyshire

You are welcome to quote passages from any of my posts, with appropriate credit. The correct citation for this looks as follow:

Dyer, Lynne (2018). Anniversaries and names. Available fromhttps://lynneaboutloughborough.blogspot.com/2018/01/anniversaries-and-names.html [Accessed 21 January 2018]

Take down policy:
I post no pictures that are not my own, unless I have express permission so to do. All text is my own, and not copied from any other information sources, printed or electronic, unless identified and credited as such. If you find I have posted something in contravention of these statements, or if there are photographs of you which you would prefer not to be here, please contact me at the address listed on the About Me page, and I will remove these.
Thank you for reading this blog. 

Lynne  
  

Sunday, 14 January 2018

A ramble around some Loughborough Connections

Today's post is one of those odd ones! A bit of half-finished research, prompted by some research I've been helping a friend with.

So, the architect William Railton built St Paul's Church at Woodhouse Eaves - amongst others - and was also responsible for the Bavarian Gates on the Garendon Estate, and Beaumanor Hall, the Herrick residence. I've posted about this before: 

http://lynneaboutloughborough.blogspot.co.uk/2016/03/william-railtons-bavarian-gates.html 

and

http://lynneaboutloughborough.blogspot.co.uk/2015/10/walk-from-loughborough-to-beaumanor.html

It appears that Railton, who lived in London, was brought to the county of Leicestershire by Ambrose Lisle March Phillipps de Lisle, who had great plans to bring Catholicism back to the county. Having designed and created a home for De Lisle at Grace Dieu (which was altered in 1837 and updated in 1847 by Augustus Welby Northmore Pugin), Railton was then commissioned to design the original Mount St Bernard's Abbey and this was followed by two lodges and a house on Garendon Park.

The folk engaged to build the abbey at Mount St Bernard were Irish Catholics, and because they settled in Whitwick, De Lisle paid for the building of a small chapel (Holy Cross Church, now demolished and rebuilt on the other side of the road) and later a presbytery (still standing and now a listed building), and engaged the services of Augustus Welby Northmore Pugin, architect. 

From about 1875 the presbytery was used by Rosminian nuns who eventually transferred to the Convent in Loughborough, which had been created around 1841 when Lady Mary Anne Arundel, born Mary Anne Nugent-Temple-Grenville, and widow of James Everard tenth Lord Arundel of Warder, opened a small girls' school in Loughborough on Paget land.

In 1844 Sisters Mary Parea and Mary Somonini took over the running of the school, and Lady Mary died the next year, following a two-day illness. She was buried in the cloisters of what is now Ratcliffe College, despite her long-standing home having been Prior Park in Bath, now a National Trust property. Further buildings at the Loughborough Convent were designed by Charles Hansom, brother to Joseph Aloysius (prominent architect, but possibly more popularly known for the design of the Hansom cab), who was highly influenced by the works of Augustus Pugin. 

Interestingly, Ratcliffe College was designed by Augustus Pugin, and the area known as The Square was designed by Charles Hansom. The Historic England listing for Ratcliffe College suggests that Augustus Pugin didn't finish the building, but that was done by Joseph Hansom, and that the chapel was created by Edward Welby Pugin, son of Augustus, in about 1875.

It doesn't appear that Edward Pugin created many buildings in Leicestershire, but he did create an 80 foot high tower, a monument to the son of Ambrose de Lisle, Everard Aloysius Lisle Phillipps VC, who was killed in the Indian Mutiny at Dehli in 1857. The tower was demolished in 1947 as it had become unstable. In 1865-6 Edward Pugin made various additions and changes to Garendon Hall.

As for the Hansoms, well, Joseph designed what is now New Walk Museum in Leicester, which was built in 1836 originally as a Nonconformist Proprietary School, and the Belvoir Street Baptist Chapel in Leicester, which is now home to the Vaughan College. At one time he lived in Hinckley, and was the architect for the Workhouse. I haven't been able to identify any further work by Joseph's brother, Charles in Leicestershire, although he has certainly designed some important buildings around the country, for example the Malvern College.

So, I think I'll end there, before I start rambling too far away from Loughborough.
    
Joseph Hansom's London House and blue plaque
Joseph Hansom's London House
Beaumanor Hall Woodhouse
Beaumanor Hall Woodhouse


You are welcome to quote passages from any of my posts, with appropriate credit. The correct citation for this looks as follow:

Dyer, Lynne (2018). A ramble around some Loughborough Connections. Available fromhttps://lynneaboutloughborough.blogspot.com/2018/01/a-ramble-around-some-loughborough.html [Accessed 14 January 2018]

Take down policy:
I post no pictures that are not my own, unless I have express permission so to do. All text is my own, and not copied from any other information sources, printed or electronic, unless identified and credited as such. If you find I have posted something in contravention of these statements, or if there are photographs of you which you would prefer not to be here, please contact me at the address listed on the About Me page, and I will remove these.
Thank you for reading this blog. 

Lynne