Sunday, 22 October 2017

Plague and Dead Lane

Last week we had a quick look at disasters and plague houses in and around Loughborough. Today, a quick word on the plague house and some comments upon Dead Lane.

Following the death of Clemente Parsons and his son, Richard Harryman was paid eleven shillings to build the Pesthouse in The Rushes. Hewgh Foster provided either the foundation for the building, or the doorway and Nicholas Smith was paid five shillings for nails, and eighteen pennies for carrying stone to the house.

Of course, you know what I'm going to say next ... Nicholas Smith also died of the plague in May 1610.

Percy Davenport, author of that 1935 article on the plague, goes on to say that the Accounts of the Bridgemasters include an entry which indicates that they paid five shillings to have the Pesthouse taken down. Initially this sounds odd, but Percy establishes that this probably refers to a building that was already standing that was to be replaced by this new one that was currently being built. A later entry in the accounts shows that the building (whether this means the old one or the new one isn't quite clear) was sold to a John Marshall of Cossington for the sum of fifty shillings. Where exactly the Pesthouse was on The Rushes is not clear.

Next we learn that people buried at this time weren't given their own coffin, so one coffin was re-used time and time again. This particular coffin was made by Robert Joyner who was paid two shillings to make it.

As well as casting huge bells for churches and cathedrals, Taylors the bellfounders on Freehold Street, also make handbells, but I don't think they were responsible for making the handbell used during times of plague in Loughborough, as Nicholas Smithe was paid four shillings and sixpence for it. Besides, Taylors were not in Loughborough at the time.

And so to the topic of Dead Lane, or le Dede Lane, or le Dedlane, or Dedelane, as it has variously been known.

Percy suggests that the story of the origin of the street name, handed down from generation to generation of Loughborough folk, and even told by a respected school teacher to pupils of the Churchgate school in the 1890s, is an unlikely tale.

Percy thinks it's also unlikely that plague pits were dug along Dead Lane in the 17th century, and has not found any evidence that the ground had been consecrated. The street name goes back much further than this, and Percy goes on to quote five instances of mention of the name Dead Lane in old documents:
the oldest comes from a deed probably in the reign of Edward II, so between 1307 and 1327, in which it is recorded that Adam, the son of Ellias de Shathewelle, was granted land in Dede Lane.
in 1460 William Staunton rented a piece of land near Dede Lane from the Lord of the Manor, which land was adjacent to several tenements on Dede Lane itself
unscoured ditches on Dede Lane in 1486 led to a number of people being fined
in 1488 someone appears to be illegally living on le Dedlane
rentals paid to the Lord of the Manor in 1490 refer to le Dede Lane
So, there were people living on Dead Lane from times much earlier than the plague of 1609-1610, and even before the earliest mention of the plague in Loughborough, in 1515.

Percy's final comments are, well, either ironic, or poignant:
"I strongly hope that the suggestion which has recently been mooted, for changing the name of this old lane, will not be listened to by the Corporation."
Today, Dead Lane, which if I remember rightly, ran alongside the Shakespeare Street School, is no longer there, being covered by the ground level car parking area of The Rushes shopping centre.

School at the end of Shakespeare Street along whose side Dead Lane used to run.
The school at the top of Shakespeare Street 

The building that runs across the end of Shakespeare Street where Dead Lane used to be.
The new build at the end of Shakespeare Street along which Dead Lane used to run

Dead Lane used to run where the fence of this car park is now.
Dead Lane used to be on the left of what is now a ground level car park in The Rushes

Dyer, Lynne (2017). Disasters in Loughborough! Available from https://lynneaboutloughborough.blogspot.com/2017/10/plague-and-dead-lane.html  [Accessed 22 October 2017]

Take down policy:
I post no pictures that are not my own, unless I have express permission so to do. All text is my own, and not copied from any other information sources, printed or electronic, unless identified and credited as such. If you find I have posted something in contravention of these statements, or if there are photographs of you which you would prefer not to be here, please contact me at the address listed on the About Me page, and I will remove these.
Thank you for reading this blog. 


Lynne 

Sunday, 15 October 2017

Disasters and plague houses

Last week we had a look at some of the fires and disease that have affected Loughborough over the years. 

A quick flick through some of the literature and I came across a chap called Percy Davenport, who had written an article about the plague, in the Loughborough Echo. A bit more a delve revealed that Percy was an "old boy" from the Grammar School, who, whilst working at the Ministry of Health, used to copy out old documents he found, in his leisure time. Some of these are the Manor Accounts and Wills of Loughborough.

So, if Percy read what he was copying in any detail, his voice holds a lot of weight. In his 1935 article in the newspaper he wrote about "When the plague came to Loughborough", saying:
In the years 1609 and 1610 Loughborough was a place to avoid, for it was then in the grip of the deadly plague. The story told by the Parish Registers is indeed a grim one. Under the month of August, 1609, the writer sets down the simple words "A plague began on the 24th day," and for the period of the next 18 months or more, long lists of victims who succumbed are entered, each name prefixed by the letter "p". 
He also mentions the possibility of there being a "plague house" somewhere, which was associated with Thomas Rawlins who founded a school in Woodhouse in 1691. This school lasted until the late eighteenth century, after which it closed until it relocated to Quorn village hall where it re-opened in 1892, firstly, as a boys' grammar (Thomas Rawlins Grammar School), before becoming a co-ed school of the same name, and based in the building occupied today by the Rawlins Academy. Thomas Rawlins is reputed to have escaped the 1665 Plague of London and settled in Pest Cottage in Old Woodhouse. This cottage is still standing today, and is named Pestilence Cottage. 
Mill stone at Pestilence Cottage Woodhouse, former school founded by Thomas Rawlins



Pestilence Cottage a school founded by Thomas Rawlins



Percy has this to say about Pest Cottage:
Whatever may be the historical facts behind the "Plague House" of Thomas Rawlins, allusions to which have appeared in recent numbers of the "Echo", we are on solid and indisputable ground when we speak of a "Plague House" in Loughborough.    
The Accounts of the Bridgemasters, (who gathered funds to maintain the bridges, and the Free Grammar School and for many other local needs) were responsible to the Feoffes of the Loughborough Town Lands, and these accounts show that the feoffes took responsibility for building a Pesthouse in The Rushes, in a vain attempt to stop the spread of the plague in 1609. 

Percy quotes from the accounts:
Payed to Richard Harryman on Thomas Wingkfeild hosse [house], in earnest for the newe house in The Rushes vjd [6 old pennies]." 
This is a formal transaction, and the builder is bound to enact the contract and build the house, which is outlined below:
Payed to Clemente Parsons for Carriadg of wood into the Rushes xjs [11 old shillings]
Ironically, both Clemente Parsons and his son died from the plague in October 1610, only a few months after this contract was agreed.

Sadly, I've run out of time to carry on with this post, so pop back next week for a final installment on the plague in Loughborough, and some comments about the infamous Dead Lane!

You are welcome to quote passages from any of my posts, with appropriate credit. The correct citation for this looks as follow:

Dyer, Lynne (2017). Disasters in Loughborough! Available fromhttps://lynneaboutloughborough.blogspot.com/2017/10/disasters-and-dead-lane.html [Accessed 15 October 2017]

Take down policy:
I post no pictures that are not my own, unless I have express permission so to do. All text is my own, and not copied from any other information sources, printed or electronic, unless identified and credited as such. If you find I have posted something in contravention of these statements, or if there are photographs of you which you would prefer not to be here, please contact me at the address listed on the About Me page, and I will remove these.
Thank you for reading this blog. 


Lynne 




Sunday, 8 October 2017

Disasters in Loughborough

Hunting around looking for something to write about, I happened upon lots of information about certain disasters that befell our lovely town, many years ago. Trouble is, there really is too much to read and digest at the moment, so here's a few tantalising mentions of plague and fire.

The Plague

*The earliest mention of the plague was in the will of Geffery Salesbury in 1515.

*In 1551 sweating sickness, which appeared to be more virulent among the higher classes, was mentioned in the Parish Records.

*Over a period of 18 months 1558-9, over 295 people died from the plague.

*In 1564 the Great Plague struck London, and reached Leicester. Because of this the Leicester Assizes met at Loughborough for a while.

*Over 452 people died of the plague in Loughborough in the outbreak of 1609-10.

*In 1631 the plague was initially concentrated around three houses, and 11 people died, but it soon took a firm hold, and eventually 1304 people died of the disease in this outbreak.

Fire

While illness might (or indeed, might not) be attributed to sanitary conditions, it is likely that fires start as a result of the industries in the town, and spread because of the wooden buildings with thatched roofs. 

*The fire in town that took place in June 1622 is mentioned in the Parish Registers.

*In 1666 (or it may have been 1668) a fire on 5th October destroyed nearly 200 houses, when a spark from a malt kiln in Wood Gate was blown so easily along the thatched roofs of the buildings. Only a week later, there was a fire in what is now Ashby Square.

*A fire in The Rushes in 1761, destroyed 13 hours in less than one hour.

*The Old Rectory, at the junction of what is now Rectory Place and Steeple Row, was re-built after it was almost completely destroyed by a fire.

*The factory of Paget and White suffered serious fire damage when a fire took hold in 1860.

*A serious attempt to make fighting fires easier came in 1866 when a fire station was built on Ashby Road, and in 1887 when the town got its very first steam-powered fire engine, this after the Nottingham Manufacturing Company was seriously damaged after a fire at the factory. 

*Taylors Bellfoundry suffered a fire in 1892.

*In 1902 there were two fires in schools, one at the Grammar School, the other at Cobden Street.

*A new fire station was built on Bridge Street in 1936.


You are welcome to quote passages from any of my posts, with appropriate credit. The correct citation for this looks as follow:

Dyer, Lynne (2017). Disasters in Loughborough! Available fromlhttps://lynneaboutloughborough.blogspot.com/2017/10/disasters-in-loughborough.html [Accessed 8 October 2017]

Take down policy:
I post no pictures that are not my own, unless I have express permission so to do. All text is my own, and not copied from any other information sources, printed or electronic, unless identified and credited as such. If you find I have posted something in contravention of these statements, or if there are photographs of you which you would prefer not to be here, please contact me at the address listed on the About Me page, and I will remove these.
Thank you for reading this blog. 

Lynne  
  





Sunday, 1 October 2017

What a milestone!

Well, if you've landed here because you are interested in milestones in project management, I'm afraid you'll be disappointed, because this blog post is about milestones or mile posts, or way markers, that are usually to be found at the side of the road!! There's such a lot of interest in these wonderful objects, that there's even a society specifically devoted to them, and plenty of books and leaflets around.

Anyway, if it's roadside markers you're interested in, then do please read on - and even if you're not, do please read on!

Apologies for the silence over the last couple of weeks: I've been putting a concerted effort into my #100days #100wordsaboutloughborough initiative, and pleased to say that this has now successfully concluded. I've also been on holiday (yes, again!) so not easily able to post to this blog.

So, whilst I was away in sunny South West Wales, I spotted loads of milestones on the sides of several major roads, and most of them looked spectacular! This is because they have relatively recently (about 2003) been dug out and restored (see the article on page 16). Well most of them! I don't have any photographs of the lovely restored ones, but here's a picture of one that needs a bit of a paint (blurred because it was taken through the car window as we were travelling) and one that seems a little worse for wear:


South West Wales

Milestone South West Wales

Milestone South West Wales


Then there were a couple of other interesting types, one in Fishguard which was an iron milestone embedded into the wall which surrounded a church, and the maker's name - Maychurch of Haverford West - is very clear on the front of the milestone. As if this weren't enough, it was painted a lovely shade of green:


Milestone at Fishguard

Milestone at Fishguard


The other interesting one was made of slate, and is now the material for new milestones along the Pembrokeshire coastal path. Here's the one at Manorbier:


Slate milestone at Manorbier


On the way back from Wales we stopped off to visit relatives near Hereford, and spotted this lovely milestone at Hampton Bishop:


Milestone at Hampton Bishop

Milestone at Hampton Bishop

Milestone at Hampton Bishop

Milestone at Hampton Bishop

Milestone at Hampton Bishop


Well, that's the rest of the country dealt with, but what of Loughborough??

We do have some really impressive milestones, both in Loughborough itself, and very close by. Here's the one on Leicester Road, just outside the cemetery:


Milestone Leicester Road Loughborough

Milestone Leicester Road Loughborough

Milestone Leicester Road Loughborough

And, here's another well-kept one on the A6 at Dishley:





The one on the A512 just the other side of Shepshed looks a little bit worse for wear, and could do with a bit of tlc. Again, the maker's mark is clearly visible in the middle - Wootton Bros, Coalville:


Milestone Shepshed A512

Milestone Shepshed A512

Milestone Shepshed A512

Milestone Shepshed A512


If you know of any other milestones close by, do please drop me a line - I'd love to know about more!

One of the other things I've spotted around Loughborough are parish boundary markers. The nearest one to Loughborough itself is the one in Woodthorpe village, outside Renals Farm:


Parish Boundary Marker Woodthorpe village outside Renals Farm

And there are another two, very close together, on Brand Lane, Woodhouse Eaves, outside Longdale Cottage. Here's a picture of the two of them, and a picture of the Lane for a bit of context:


Parish Boundary Marker Brand Lane Woodhouse Eaves

Parish Boundary Marker Brand Lane Woodhous Eaves

Brand Lane


So, that's it! What? No? You mean I've forgotten the best one of all? No, of course, not! Here it is!!! This milepost has been moved! It is believed to have come from Shardlow, and appeared mysteriously one night whilst Harry Sheffield was the landlord of the Old Pack Horse, so that would have been sometime between 1912 and 1938! If you're looking for the distance to Derby, you'll find this has been buried beneath the tarmac!!! And a picture of the Old Pack Horse, where the milestone can be seen just underneath the "ly"!!!


Milestone outside the Pack Horse pub Loughborough

Milestone outside the Old Pack Horse, Loughborough, now the Organ Grinder



You are welcome to quote passages from any of my posts, with appropriate credit. The correct citation for this looks as follow:

Dyer, Lynne (2017). What a milestone! Available fromhttps://lynneaboutloughborough.blogspot.com/2017/10/what-milestone.html [Accessed 1 October 2017]

Take down policy:
I post no pictures that are not my own, unless I have express permission so to do. All text is my own, and not copied from any other information sources, printed or electronic, unless identified and credited as such. If you find I have posted something in contravention of these statements, or if there are photographs of you which you would prefer not to be here, please contact me at the address listed on the About Me page, and I will remove these.
Thank you for reading this blog. 


Lynne  

Sunday, 10 September 2017

Killed by a lion

Yesterday I went off to the open morning at the Record Office for Leicester, Leicestershire and Rutland (ROLLR) in Wigston as part of the Heritage Open Weekend, when buildings that are not often open to the public, or who normally make an admission charge, open their doors for free. ROLLR is actually open for many hours a week, and I don't believe there is an admission charge, but the main reason they were open was to hold a celebratory party to celebrate their 70th birthday!

The event was very popular, and loads of people turned up for the presentation on the new Base Hospital database. This building was formerly the Leicestershire and Rutland County Lunatic Asylum (constructed of Mountsorrel white bricks), and is now the Fielding Johnson Building, an admin building at the University of Leicester. However, during WW1 the building was used as a military hospital.  

As well as the presentation of the database there were cakes and snacks modelled on the 1940s, and guided tours of the strong room and the conservation areas. Around the search rooms were dotted some cabinets with original documents in them, included the oldest document helped by ROLLR which was from the 1100s.

One of the documents on display was one I've seen and read before, and was on display because it shows the way people used to draw people's attention to something of interest that had been written - a hand drawn manicule in the border. The document also reports a strange and very sad occurrence in the town:
"Roger Sheppard, sonne in lawe to Nicholas Wollandes was sleayne by a Lyones - whiche was brought, into the towne, to be seyne of such as would gyve money to see her. He was soore wounded in sondrey places and was buried the xxi daye of august 1579." 
Of course, there are a number of clarifications and questions that arise upon reading about this dreadful event. A sonne in lawe at the time would actually have been a stepson, and at the time of the accident, poor little Roger was only 5. According to further reports he received five injuries, the mortal being the one in his left side, opposite his heart, which wound was 1 inch long, 1 inch wide and 6 inches deep. The accident happened on 20th August 1579, and Roger, who died at 11am that day, was buried the next day.

The lioness was being looked after by John Castle in a room belonging to Nicholas Wollandes, a Bailiff of the town, and it was chained to a beam. Clearly this tether was insufficient, and the lioness used its teeth and claws on the young child. I have to wonder why someone had a lioness in their house, and how they came to have it, and why they thought it was safe to be viewed at such close quarters. 

If you would like to read more stories of accidents in Tudor England, have a look at the website: Everyday life and fatal hazard in sixteenth-century England.

Such a sad story to end your Sunday evening - sorry.    


You are welcome to quote passages from any of my posts, with appropriate credit. The correct citation for this looks as follow:

Dyer, Lynne (2017). Bridges, buses, trains, balloons and runners! Available from: https://lynneaboutloughborough.blogspot.com/2017/09/killed-by-lion.html [Accessed 10 September 2017]

Take down policy:
I post no pictures that are not my own, unless I have express permission so to do. All text is my own, and not copied from any other information sources, printed or electronic, unless identified and credited as such. If you find I have posted something in contravention of these statements, or if there are photographs of you which you would prefer not to be here, please contact me at the address listed on the About Me page, and I will remove these.

Thank you for reading this blog. 

Lynne 

Sunday, 3 September 2017

Bridges, buses, trains, balloons and runners!

Well, this last week seems to have been all about transport of one sort or another!!

Last weekend a hot air balloon was spotted flying over Loughborough, and it came so close to my house I managed to take a couple of pictures, from the front bedroom window, and then from the back.




Hot air balloon over Loughborough

Hot air balloon over Loughborough

Hot air balloon over Loughborough

Hot air balloon over Loughborough

Hot air balloon over Loughborough

Hot air balloon over Loughborough

So, the Bridge to the Future is looking like the Bridge of Today - or last night!! Apparently, around 2am contractors working for the GCR put into place a couple of beams for the reinstating of the bridge over the Midland Mainline. The event is well-covered over on the GCR website, and there are some fabulous pictures of the overnight event. Below are some of my own photos from this morning.


Bridge to the Future GCR Loughborough

Bridge to the Future GCR Loughborough

Bridge to the Future GCR Loughborough

Bridge to the Future GCR Loughborough

Bridge to the Future GCR Loughborough

Bridge to the Future GCR Loughborough

On the way back from the 10K race at Abbey Park in Leicester this morning, we spotted a number of old buses pulling in and out of the Park and Ride at Birstall, so having spent some time this morning down at the Midland Mainline dropping a youngster off for a train, before popping over the road to look more closely at the GCR bridge, what better thing to do than walk to Quorn and Woodhouse Station and see those buses from the Leicester Transport Heritage Trust, a bit closer up! And how exciting that was too! Especially as we bumped into an expert friend who was able to tell us if the coach bodies were Brush, or shhhh, made in Lancashire! I must admit, although I wasn't familiar with the buses we saw, the little Midland Red, did remind me very much of the Western Welsh buses from Abergavenny. Of course, Q&W is a railway station, so we also saw trains!

Loughborough Midland Mainline Railway Station



Leicester 10K 3 September 2017

Bus stop at Quorn and Woodhouse Station, GCR

Midland Red single-decker bus

Midland Red single decker bus

Midland Red single decker bus

Midland Red single decker bus

Leicester 1964 Leyland PD3A/1 double decker bus

Leicester 1964 Leyland PD3A/1 double decker bus

Leicester 1964 Leyland PD3A/1 double decker bus

Eastern Belle blue coach

Double decker bus

Quorn and Woodhouse station




Steam locomotive at Quorn and Woodhouse station

Carriages at Quorn and Woodhouse station



I wonder what next week has in store for me?


You are welcome to quote passages from any of my posts, with appropriate credit. The correct citation for this looks as follow:

Dyer, Lynne (2017). Bridges, buses, trains, balloons and runners! Available from: https://lynneaboutloughborough.blogspot.com/2017/09/bridges-buses-trains-balloons-and.html [Accessed 3 September 2017]

Take down policy:
I post no pictures that are not my own, unless I have express permission so to do. All text is my own, and not copied from any other information sources, printed or electronic, unless identified and credited as such. If you find I have posted something in contravention of these statements, or if there are photographs of you which you would prefer not to be here, please contact me at the address listed on the About Me page, and I will remove these.
Thank you for reading this blog. 


Lynne